Red pony leader of the people

The final story was originally published later under the title "The Grandfather. The inclusion of this story in the edition shows Steinbeck's intention to round out and to complete a thematic structure for this work.

Red pony leader of the people

High in the air small clouds like puffs of cannon smoke were driven eastward by the March wind. The wind could be heard whishing in the brush on the ridge crests, but no breath of it penetrated down into the ranch cup.

The little boy, Jody, emerged from the house eating a thick piece of buttered bread. He saw Billy working on the last of the haystack.

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Jody Red pony leader of the people down scuffing his shoes in the way he had been told was destructive to a good shoe-leather.

A flock of white pigeons flew out of the black cypress tree as Jody passed, and circled the tree and landed again. A half-grown tortoise- shell cat leaped from the bunkhouse porch, galloped on stiff legs across the road, whirled and galloped back again.

Jody picked up a stone to help the game along, but he was too late, for the cat was under the porch before the stone could be discharged. He threw the stone into the cypress tree and started the white pigeons on another whirling flight.

Arriving at the used-up haystack, the boy leaned against the barbed wire fence. The middle-aged ranch-hand stopped his careful raking and stuck his fork into the ground.

He took off his black hat and smoothed down his hair. He replaced his hat and rubbed his dry leathery hands together. He lifted a forkful of the damp ground-hay and threw it into the air.

Instantly three mice leaped out and burrowed frantically under the hay again. Jody sighed with satisfaction. Those plump, sleek, arrogant mice were doomed. For eight months the had lived and multiplied in the haystack. Now the time of disaster had come; they would not survive another day.

Billy looked up at the top of the hills that surrounded the ranch. You know how he is. His father, Carl Tiflin, insisted upon giving permission for anything that was done on the ranch, whether it was important or not. Jody sagged father against the post until he was sitting on the ground. He looked up at the little puffs of wind-driven cloud.

Billy worked on without comment. Jody turned back and looked at the side-hill where the road from the outside world came down. Silver thistles, blue lupins and a few poppies bloomed among the sage bushed.

Halfway up the hill Jody could see Double-tree Mutt, the black dow, digging in a squirrel hole. Suddenly, while Jody watched, the black dog stiffened, and backed out of the hole and looked up the hill toward the cleft in the ridge where the road came through.

Jody looked up too. The boy started to his feet. He trotted away toward the ranch house, for the letter would probably be read aloud and he wanted to be there. He heard Carl dismount from his creaking saddle and slap the horse on the side to send it to the barn where Billy would unsaddle it and turn it out.

Jody ran into the kitchen. His mother looked up from a pan of beans. I saw it in his hand. His father looked down at him contemptuously.The Red Pony: Novel Summary: Story 4 - The Leader of the People. 20; 40; 60; 80; ; Average Overall Rating: 1 Total Votes: Summary One March afternoon, Billy Buck is using a rake to pitch the last of the usable hay from the old years' haystack to some of the cows.

There are white puffy clouds in the sky and the sound of wind on the.

Red pony leader of the people

When The Red Pony was reissued in , Steinbeck included this story under the title of "The Leader of the People" as the last story of the volume.

The inclusion of this story in the edition shows Steinbeck's intention to round out and to complete a thematic structure for this work.

When The Red Pony was reissued in , Steinbeck included this story under the title of "The Leader of the People" as the last story of the volume.

The inclusion of this story in the edition shows Steinbeck's intention to round out and to complete a thematic structure for this work. from The Red Pony by Johm Steinbeck On Saturday afternoon Billy Buck, the ranch-hand, raked together the last of the old year's haystack and pitched small forkfuls .

His wonderful novellas The Red Pony, Cannery Row, Of Mice and Men, and The Pearl not only introduce readers to a fascinating, realistic cast of characters, make the hills and seacoast of California and Mexico come to life, but also tell intriguing stories of the lives of real people.

3 people found this helpful. Helpful. Comment Report abuse. Scott F Feighner. Not me! I loved "The Red Pony" the first time I read it, 45 years ago. I loved it again in Some American Classics - - particularly Steinbeck - - must be read more than once, years apart, to fully internalize the art and craft.4/5().

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