An introduction to the history of the bubonic plague

The winters were extremely cold and the summers were dry. Due to this extreme weather, very low crops yielded and those that grew were dying. Inflation became a common occurrence and as famine broke out, people began to worry. The time period of approximately to is now known as the famine before the plague.

An introduction to the history of the bubonic plague

The disease spread fast and covered the territory from China to England and the ultimate western part of Europe, covering almost entire Europe within several years. The disease was a true mystery for Medieval people, whereas the medicine was under-developed to cope with such a disease as the Black Death, which was presumably a plague.

The development and spread of the disease was fast and provoked the depopulation of Europe. At the same time, the Black Death had not only a devastating demographic impact but also the disease had a disastrous economic impact on Europe as well as other countries of the world and, what is more, the disease contributed to the consistent change of social relations, re-evaluation of the lifestyle and values of people living in the pandemic-stricken Europe and other countries of the world.

In such a way, the Black Death affected the demographic situation in Europe and other countries of the world, changed socioeconomic relations and provoked re-consideration of basic values and beliefs of people living in that time.

The emergence of the Black Death in Europe was associated with the spread of the pandemic from the East. In fact, the origin of plagues is not clearly identified but the most likely region of the origin of the plague was China or the nearby territory.

The plague spread from China westward via the Silk Road. In the course of time, the plague reached Crimea and Constantinople. The latter was one of the major trade centers between the West and the East. As a result, Constantinople became the place, where merchants and travelers from Europe and Asia as well as Africa came across.

Goods from the East moved to Europe through Constantinople mainly and so did the plague. In fact, it is through Constantinople and moved further throughout Mediterranean countries. From the Mediterranean, the plague spread further throughout Europe affecting more and more countries.

In such a way, the plague spread throughout Europe in the course of several years and affected the large population of Europe causing numerous deaths and depopulation of Europe.

At the same time, symptoms of the disease were different in the East and in the West. To put it more precisely, the nose bleeding in the East was the major symptom, which marked the upcoming death of patients.

In stark contrast, nose bleeding was not a symptom of the Black Death in Europe. Instead, Europeans suffered from lumps in the groin or armpits.

After the appearance of the lumps, livid black spots appeared on the arms and thighs and other parts of the body.

Ill people died within three days. In such a way, the disease was extremely dangerous and people died fast, whereas the contamination meant virtually certain death to ill persons. In fact, the medieval medicine had come unprepared to resist the Black Death. People had no idea of contagious diseases and the epidemic spread fast.

People buried deceased unprotected, whereas the burial was insufficient to protect from the spread of the disease.

Towns and cities were full of decaying filth, which contributed to the rise of the rat population, which also contributed to the fast spread of the plague in Europe. People did not how to treat the disease and they did not know how to prevent the spread of the pandemic. Moreover, they did not even view it as a mere disease.

Instead, they believed the Black Death was the punishment from the part of God, which people have to take. The response of the society to the Black Death was characterized by consistent changes in the society.

European society was devastated by the disease. Towns and cities were depopulated and suffered from the shortage of food. The large share of the rural population died out too. European society faced the threat of starvation.

AngliaCampus : The Black Death - introduction

As a result, peasants started to move from their villages to other villages being attracted by lords that undermined the main principle of the feudal system where peasants were tied to the land that belong to landlords.

The Black Death started to wreak havoc in Europe and the society came unprepared to the pandemics. In such a situation, religion, which was the main source of salvation for people, still played an important part in the life of people and explanation of the disease.The Black Death - introduction.

The Black Death or Plague was an epidemic which reached Europe in the s although it started half way across the world.. There had been plagues at various times for thousands of years, some of which may have been similar to the Black Death.

Plague, Early History | r-bridal.com

Plague I. Introduction & history: Last November a park ranger found a dead mountain lion.

An introduction to the history of the bubonic plague

He took it home and performed a necropsy (autopsy) on the mountain lion. Bubonic & Septicemic plague spread through bites of infected fleas. - Rats carry the plague, and fleas live on rats. Bubonic plague is the best-known form of the disease plague, which is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis.

The name bubonic plague is specific for this form of the disease, which enters through the skin, and travels through the lymphatic system.

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The Black Death, also often called the “bubonic plague” was an epidemic of disastrous proportions that is said to have killed up to 50% of the European population in the ’s and around 12 million people in China in the s.

Plague is a term applied to an infectious disease that spreads easily and, without antibiotics treatment, can be fatal. Learn about plague disease symptoms, causes, history, and types: bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic. The Black Death created a race for survival and all were playing.

As they continued to run from the plague, the people of Europe felt that they needed to blame someone for causing the outrage. At this time in history, Christians persecuted Jews in Europe and blamed them for bad luck and even bad weather.

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